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Lakeshore - [writing|publishing] What my publisher does for me, and why I won't just quit
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Jay Lake
Date: 2010-02-04 05:56
Subject: [writing|publishing] What my publisher does for me, and why I won't just quit
Security: Public
Tags:amazonfail, personal, process, publishing, writing
In the process of various Amazon-related discussions in both my own blog comments sections and on the Kindle boards, I've come to realize that most people have no idea what the publisher does for a book between the time the writer is finished drafting the manuscript and the time the book hits the store shelves. Which is fair enough. I didn't either, before I became an author in the trade press.

This is only tangentially related to the Amazon-Macmillan kerfuffle, but might of interest to those who wonder why ebooks don't have a much cheaper cost basis than printed books. And is almost certainly of interest to aspiring writers who want to understand more about the nuts and bolts of the publication process.

The Manuscript from the Writer's Perspective

(This sample time line ignores breaks I generally take, for example, between first and second draft to allow the book to percolate in my subconsious. Like wine, books are better with ageing. Breaks enforced by the production process are still included.)

Month -12 — Finance issues signing check to me via agent. (Payment 1 of 3 in typical contracts today.)

Month -11 — Agent issues signing check to me, less commission.

Months 1-2 — I draft a book.

Months 3-4 — I redraft the book.

Month 5 — First readers provide feedback and comment.

Month 6 — I redraft the book.

Month 7 — Second readers, including my agent and my editor, provide feedback and comment.

Month 8 — I redraft the book, paying most special attention to the changes directed by my editor.

Month 9 — I turn the book in.

Month 10 — Finance issues acceptance check to me via agent. (Payment 2 of 3 in typical contracts today.)

Month 11 — Agent issues acceptance check to me, less commission.

Month 12 — I receive a copy edit.

Month 12 — I respond to the copy edit and associated queries.

Month 16 — I receive the page proofs for the hardback release.

Month 16 — I respond to the page proofs, typos, layout problems and critical errors only. No larger revisions to the text.

Month 22 — Hardback printing goes on sale.

Month 22 — Finance issues publication check to me via agent. (Payment 3 of 3 in typical contracts today.)

Month 23 — Agent issues publication check to me, less commission.

Month 26 — I receive the page proofs for the mass market paperback release.

Month 26 — I respond to the page proofs, typos, layput problems and critical errors only. No larger revisions to the text.

Month 26 — Having now gone through at least four drafts, and read it about nine times, I am finally done with the damned book.

The Manuscript from the Publisher's Perspective

(This is as best I understand it. I'm certainly missing a lot. I'm not sure when cast-offs are done, the legal steps, etc. And I know some of the process checkpoints and professional roles are completely missing or misunderstood, this is just what I can see Corrections welcomed! Especially if I left out your job.)

Month -12 — Finance issues signing check to author via agent. (Payment 1 of 3 in typical contracts today.)

Month 7 — Acquiring editor receives preliminary manuscript from writer. Provides editorial feedback in change letter.

Month 9 — Acquiring editor receives final manuscript from writer. Provides acceptance letter, transmits to production.

Month 10 — Production editor sends manuscript to copy editor.

Month 10 — Art director begins sourcing cover art.

Month 10 — Production editor confirms press time slot for book.

Month 10 — Finance issues acceptance check to author via agent. (Payment 2 of 3 in typical contracts today.)

Month 11 — Copy editor returns copy edited manuscript.

Month 12 — Editorial assistant sends copy edit to author.

Month 12 — Editorial assistant receives copy edit back from author.

Month 13 — Production editor turns manuscript over to book designer.

Month 14 — Book designer sends hardback book to typesetter.

Month 15 — Typesetter does initial layout for hardback release.

Month 16 — Editorial assistant sends hardback page proofs to author.

Month 16 — Editorial assistant receives hardback page proofs from author.

Month 17 — Typesetter makes proof changes.

Month 18 — Proofing editor reviews changes.

Month 18 — Hardback printing goes to press.

Month 19 — Hardback printing goes to warehouse.

Month 21 — Hardback printing released to distribution

Month 22 — Hardback printing goes on sale.

Month 22 — Finance issues publication check to author via agent. (Payment 3 of 3 in typical contracts today.)

Month 24 — Production editor confirms press time slot for book.

Month 24 — Production editor turns manuscript over to book designer.

Month 24 — Book designer sends mass market paperback book to typesetter.

Month 25 — Typesetter does initial layout for mass market paperback release.

Month 26 — Editorial assistant sends mass market paperback page proofs to author.

Month 26 — Editorial assistant receives mass market paperback page proofs from author.

Month 27 — Typesetter makes proof changes.

Month 28 — Proofing editor reviews changes.

Month 28 — Mass market paperback printing goes to press.

Month 29 — Mass market paperback printing goes to warehouse.

Month 31 — Mass market paperback printing released to distribution

Month 32 — Mass market paperback printing goes on sale.

As you can see, this life cycle lasts 44 months from contract signing to paperback release. And that's if everything goes quickly and well, given that this is a nearly ideal model.

What else the publisher does

In the book's workflow, it's touched by over a dozen people on the publisher's side. The above doesn't even account for legal, for public relations, for the sales force, for the warehouse and distribution folks, for the ebook format conversion and digital rights people.

Those services the publisher provides the book are invaluable. And well beyond my reach were I to attempt to secure them on my own. The editorial process, from the acquiring editor as well as the copy editor, improves the quality of my books in ways I can't begin to manage with my individual effort, nor could I afford to contract the equivalent many thousands of dollars of labor involved. My editor has experience and depth of knowledge I won't match in a lifetime of being an author, simply because of the number of books she handles. My copy editor has the same depth of experience, plus the training to see things invisible to me, but that will jump out to readers. Everything from continuity errors to fact checking to consistency in geography to basic physics (I was once asked how someone could jump down forty feet in bare feet, and walk away.)

Then there's cover art: expensive and important. Cover design. Marketing and branding. My publisher gets me reviewed in trade magazines that I could never reach on my own. My starred reviews in Booklist and Library Journal drive significant library sales for each of my hardcover print runs, accounting for a meaningful portion of my earn out. My publisher advertises my books in trade magazines and fiction magazines. None of which I could afford to do on my own, and some which I couldn't manage even I had the money out of pocket.

All in all, my publisher adds an enormous amount of quality and value to my books that I couldn't provide any other way. They make me a better author, and they give you a better reading experience.

Why I won't quit my publisher

I've had people tell me I'd make more money per title if I left my publisher and self-published. I could keep more of the take. Given how much distribution I'd lose, I'd have to make a lot more per unit sold to offset the economic hit. Even doing that assumes that that selling fewer books for more money per title is a good thing. For my lifetime career as an author, I would always rather reach more readers, even if I make less money per reader. Or in some cases, less money over all.

I write 1-2 books a year, and plan to keep doing so til I drop dead. Why on earth would I want to reduce my readership to maximize income on any given title? That's deeply counterproductive.

There's also the issue of control. I'm a writer. How is it worth my time to self-edit, do my own layouts and production management? I add no value during those steps, I'm merely offsetting cost. All my value add come from the auctorial process, the actual writing. That's where the unique product and brand identity come from. Not flowing words into columns and managing margins. Which I actually know how to do, fairly well in fact. But it's not nearly the best use of my time, given that I could be writing more books and stories.

Some people have suggested I should get out of a dying business model before it takes me down with it. I appreciate the sentiment, and believe me, Macmillan knows their traditional business model is in peril. The whole Amazon negotiation is a very public way of trying to address that trouble. Whether or not it will succeed is a question I'm not smart enough to answer. Publishing is not run by stupid people, quite the opposite, and they're looking for the right transformation for their own interests. Which in turn will protect my interests, as we are well aligned at the moment.

What I do know is that neither the New Media nor some clever independent thinker has yet offered me an alternate business model that will provide me with either the quality of service or the economic incentives that Macmillan provides me with. Show me a place to go, and you might have an argument. Telling me to quit on principle because something good is just around the corner is simply foolish, at least from the perspective of me keeping books on the shelf and some income in my bank account.

It's also been suggested that I leave Macmillan in protest of their business practices in the Amazon ebook pricing dispute, and go elsewhere. First of all, it's not the least bit clear to me that Macmillan has done anything unprincipled in the ebook pricing negotiations. Amazon clearly has behaved in an unprincipled manner with delisting the print titles that come under different contracts and distribution channels and are thus completely unrelated to ebooks in a business sense, but that's been my point all along — the delisting really isn't Macmillan's responsibility in any way that I can see, as it was a unilateral decision by Amazon. The rest of the negotiation issues are, frankly, just business.

But for the sake of argument, let's posit that Macmillan has in fact acted contrary to my interests as one of their authors. Why would switching to one of the other six houses improve my position, when they all follow the same business models and trade practices? I'm no more likely to find a 'safer' haven with one of the other major trade publishers, as they substantially share Macmillan's business interests and issues, in much the same fashion that airlines or automakers or fast food chains share business interests and issues.

However, again, let's posit that I can be assured that one of Macmillan's competing houses will treat me better, hold my interests closer, and not behave in our assumed unethical manner. Switching houses is difficult at best. I'd essentially have to wait out my current contract cycle (which extends through 2012 for initial releases and 2013 for follow-ons) to be clear of Macmillan. I'd have to convince another house to invest in my author brand, which is closely associated with Tor at this point. I'd have to convince another editor to sufficient interest in my work, which is a deeply idiosyncratic process more or less lateral to the publishing house issue.

Yes, I'm established, I could probably pull it off, but only at a likely substantial cost to my career and my income — I would probably miss a year or two or more of releases, and have to deal with contract entanglements. And that's assuming I could even sell to another house, which is far from a given. I'm low midlist, which is about the lowest form of life in the trade press. I'm simply not popular enough for another house to go to the trouble of taking me on, were I in this theoretical dispute with Macmillan.

Switching publishing houses isn't like changing your grocery store of choice, or even car model of choice. While the author has ultimate and final control of who they publish with — we own the copyrights, after all — we have very little control and only slightly more influence over who wants to publish with us. That's driven by market power and reader demand, and through those factors, the financial performance of our books. It's a very strange power dynamic at best.

In other words, my principles had better be mightily offended before I'd be willing to mess with my Macmillan relationship for their sake. it's not at all clear to me why I should consider Macmillan a villain in the first place here. Pricing disputes occur every day between corporations, there's nothing unusual about the basic issue here, even if the larger implications are enormous.

Mind you, Macmillan and I could part company at the end of any contract cycle, if my books don't hold up their profitability. If that happens, I won't be very pleased about it. But ultimately, that's just business too.




ETA: In answer to several queries already received, please share this blog post freely with students, critique groups, or other interested parties. I ask only that you retain my attribution, and provide info linking back to my blog.

© 2010 Joseph E. Lake, Jr., writing as "Jay Lake".

Creative Commons License
"What my publisher does for me, and why I won't just quit" by Joseph E. Lake, Jr. writing as "Jay Lake" is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License. Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at jlake@jlake.com.

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fjm
User: fjm
Date: 2010-02-04 14:22 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
May I give this to my students?
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Jay Lake
User: jaylake
Date: 2010-02-04 14:52 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Please do, share freely! [With attribution, of course, but you know that. :)]
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Ken Scholes
User: kenscholes
Date: 2010-02-04 14:40 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Excellent overview, sir. Well done.
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GirasoleAzzurra/The LadyHawk: GA Nov09
User: girasole
Date: 2010-02-04 14:47 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:GA Nov09
Jay, may I link this for my graduate students in children's/YA literature? They don't have a clue, and this gives them one. Thank you.
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Jay Lake
User: jaylake
Date: 2010-02-04 14:53 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Please, do share freely with attribution. I'm going to put a note at the bottom of the post for others that are interested in doing so, since you're the second person who's asked.
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Beth
User: casacorona
Date: 2010-02-04 14:54 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Um. You left out a lot of what happens before your book is acquired, and after your book is accepted. I don't have time right now to run through that, but I think I might have (somewhere) a description of that process from Editorial's point of view. There's legal stuff, there's finance, there's materials acquisition (the paper), there is sales and marketing positioning, there are lots of sales materials prepared (from stuff you see, like catalog and flap copy, to stuff you don't see: sales background, sales pitch recordings), ad preparation and placement, promo plan development, etc.

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Jay Lake
User: jaylake
Date: 2010-02-04 15:06 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
I actually didn't dip into acquisition except by reference, but it would awesome if you had the time to fill me in at some point on both acquisition and acceptance. I'd update and repost with more accurate information.

You're only the first of several I expect to hear from about all the stuff I left out. But I had to start somewhere... :)
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scarlettina: Book love
User: scarlettina
Date: 2010-02-04 15:42 (UTC)
Subject: Acquisitions editors before and after manuscript delivery
Keyword:Book love
I figured casacarona would respond somehow and there she is. I'll agree that a lot happens before acquisition and after delivery that you never see. It's been literally years since I did this work full time and I'm sure there have been changes to the process, but given how much the timeline has extended since I was in the business, I can't believe it's gotten much simpler. The following is roughly in order, though I wouldn't venture to guess where they fall on the timeline these days, and I'm pretty sure there's stuff I've left out, especially as regards preparation for electronic or audio distribution (if applicable).

For any book that's acquired, the editor not only has to read the manuscript (and possibly have other editors read it as well), but argue a case for its acquisition to the publisher. That includes running a profit and loss estimate through production and accounting. If the numbers don't make sense, regardless of how much you love a book, it's bye-bye-baby.

If the numbers work then, based on the P&L, the editor and the agent negotiate the book's purchase. The deal notes (usually via some sort of form) are forwarded to legal so a contract can be produced.

The editor reads the manuscript, usually at least twice, maybe more, to prepare editorial notes for the author.

Once the author delivers revisions, the editor reads the revised manuscript, doing a line edit if necessary before forwarding the book to production (which includes interior and exterior design), to the copy department for jacket copy, to the subsidiary rights department for subrights sales, and to sales & marketing for sales and advertising to review, and to PR. Copies of the manuscript may also be delivered to other authors to solicit quotes for cover copy.

Marketing materials are prepared, most often based on materials provided by the acquiring editor: novel summary, sales history, key selling points, author bio, that sort of thing. Editors also often are the book's advocate at the publisher's sales conference, or they provide some sort of extra material and information to be provided to the sales force directly. In my experience, this ranged from doing a video sales pitch to recording a reading of an excerpt from the book to be distributed to salespeople.

Cover copy is prepared. Cover art is commissioned and revised. Catalog copy is produced.

A copyeditor copyedits the manuscript. A book designer lays out the interior of the book. In the case of a hardcover, they also design the cloth-over-boards cover. If illustrations or maps are required, those must be commissioned. The more elaborate the interior, the more people are involved in its preparation.

Page proofs are produced and distributed to the author and the proofreader.

Covers are produced, uniting art, design and copy. (Somewhere in there, pricing, UPC codes and so on are generated.)

Page proofs are turned into bound galleys (advance reading copies, or ARCs) for the sales and PR departments. The ARCs are sent out to review venues and booksellers to start sales buzz.

Sales solicitation occurs.

Ads, if there's budget for same, are placed.

Corrected page proofs are slugged (i.e., they're reviewed by a proofreader to ensure that author and proofreader corrections to the galleys were properly introduced and that no new errors were generated in the process).

Pages are delivered back to the printer. Books are printed and distributed.

That's pretty rough and I'm certain I'm leaving things out--it's been years, like I said. But it's a start.

Edited at 2010-02-04 03:43 pm (UTC)
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Elizabeth Coleman
User: criada
Date: 2010-02-04 18:12 (UTC)
Subject: Re: Acquisitions editors before and after manuscript delivery
Speaking of copy editing...
You've got two "Month 10 — Finance issues acceptance check to author via agent. (Payment 2 of 3 in typical contracts today.)" in the Publishers' pov section.
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Jay Lake
User: jaylake
Date: 2010-02-04 18:48 (UTC)
Subject: Re: Acquisitions editors before and after manuscript delivery
Fixed, thanks!
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Elizabeth Coleman
User: criada
Date: 2010-02-04 18:12 (UTC)
Subject: Re: Acquisitions editors before and after manuscript delivery
Oops. Hit wrong reply button. Referring to OP, not you. :-)
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Beth
User: casacorona
Date: 2010-02-04 21:46 (UTC)
Subject: Re: Acquisitions editors before and after manuscript delivery
That's about it. We don't have a separate copywriting department, though many houses do. Editorial writes all catalog, cover, and sales copy for the books.

Also, every stage of the book's packaging and production goes through the editor who has to sign off on all of it. There's only one person at a publisher who knows everything about a given title, and that's the book's editor.
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scarlettina
User: scarlettina
Date: 2010-02-04 22:19 (UTC)
Subject: Re: Acquisitions editors before and after manuscript delivery
Sounds like things were a little more compartmentalized at Bantam. The Managing Editor did a lot of traffic management and there were some steps I didn't participate in, but not many.

And there may not be a copy department at Bantam anymore, though I don't know, of course. I was writing a lot of copy when I was there, despite the presence of a copy department. And editors approved every piece of copy related to their books, so even if they didn't write it, they saw it.
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Joshua R Parker
User: defectivewookie
Date: 2010-02-04 15:48 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Thank you for taking the time to do this.

Unfortunately the people who need to see this the most will likely not see it at all.

As an aspiring writer, I find this kind of help invaluable.
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CJ Marsicano (CJマルシカノ): Snoopy 'In my own write'
User: cjmarsicano
Date: 2010-02-04 15:56 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:Snoopy 'In my own write'
I'm surprised that the books sit in a warehouse for over a month after they're published - at least that's how it looks from reading this list.

On a sort of related note, I'd like to see someone in the music industry write up a list like this of just what record labels do.
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Joe Morrison
User: argonel
Date: 2010-02-04 17:53 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
As the esteemed Mr. Lake pointed out this is an idealized schedule. I suspect that the warehouse time is scheduled to put a little slack into the schedule in case deadlines slip after the release date has been determined.
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Emily
User: torrilin
Date: 2010-02-04 20:59 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
I'm not. "Warehouse" does not mean "sits in a brick building near the Port of New York docks". It means the books are being moved from the factory where they're published to the point of sale. This may involve sitting in a brick building, but quite a lot of the time these days, it would involve sitting around in a tractor trailer or the hold of a cargo ship.

If you have sufficient drivers to do watch on watch and good weather, it's possible to do a cross continent drive in about 48 hours. That means you need about 3 drivers... which is not practical for most trucking lines. More realistically, it will take about 4 days of driving. Trains are more efficient (less time and greater mass moved). Planes are faster, but much less efficient. Due to geography, boats are not practicable, but if they were they'd clock in about on par with trains.

At least some portion of books sold in the US are no longer *printed* in the US, so that makes moving the physical books around more complex. Not in the US generally means SE Asia, which means the container ship will hit the Port of Los Angeles, or *possibly* the Port of Seattle... The west coast does not have anywhere near as good a selection of seaports as the east, and the transit lines out of the ports are a Giant Pain In The Ass. (this isn't going to be the preferred strategy, because working with a SE Asia factory means you have the built in cost of a 3 month Pacific cruise for the books... and that is gonna be really bloody hard on the production schedule)
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Beth
User: casacorona
Date: 2010-02-04 21:40 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Nearly all of our books are printed in North America. There have been the occasional 4-color interior book that is printed overseas.

"Warehouse" means shipping the pallets of manufactured books to the warehouse, where the pallets are broken up and the books sorted into shipment quantities to fill all the orders, and then shipped out again. Often we are shipping to intermediate wholesalers, or to chain distribution warehouses. We try to time the shipping so that the stock hits all retail outlets at about the same time, i.e. a few days before "Publication Date".

A month to cover all of that for a hundred titles every month is really pretty tightly scheduled.


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cairech
User: cairech
Date: 2010-02-12 18:21 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
On the contrary, many books never hit the warehouse before going to distributors (who then supply booksellers.) Brand new books often ship straight from the printer.
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Jay Lake
User: jaylake
Date: 2010-02-12 18:27 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Brand new books often ship straight from the printer.

Well, yes. I was shorthanding that part of the distribution process (loading dock, truck, etc.) because while I do know something about logistics in general, I don't know much about book distribution logistics in particular.
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MG Ellington
User: xjenavivex
Date: 2010-02-04 17:11 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
::applauds::
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cj_ruby
User: cj_ruby
Date: 2010-02-04 17:11 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Great info Jay, thanks for taking the time to post this.

Yesterday I wrote in my blog that writers don't write for the money, they write because they're writers. I hope I didn't leave the impression that I don't think writers should be compensated for their work/art. I think they are driven to write. No one would become a writer to get rich, that would be essence of crazy. An author can never be remunerated for what they pour of themselves into their work.

This Amazon-Macmillan kerfuffle bothers readers like me, because in the end, it doesn't hurt the big corporations it hurts the authors, which deprives the readers (even if they don't realize it) of the commodity/art they love.
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R.K. Bentley: draft zero
User: rkbwrites
Date: 2010-02-04 17:15 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:draft zero
Great post, thanks!
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Barbara Caridad Ferrer
User: ex_fashioni
Date: 2010-02-04 17:45 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
There's also the issue of control. I'm a writer. How is it worth my time to self-edit, do my own layouts and production management? I add no value during those steps, I'm merely offsetting cost. All my value add come from the auctorial process, the actual writing. That's where the unique product and brand identity come from. Not flowing words into columns and managing margins. Which I actually know how to do, fairly well in fact. But it's not nearly the best use of my time, given that I could be writing more books and stories.

This paragraph needs to be engraved on a tablet or at least printed out and taped to every writer's monitor.

Or it could just be shortened to "Shaddup and write, already."
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beth_bernobich
User: beth_bernobich
Date: 2010-02-07 22:44 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
This.

I have a full-time job. I have a family and house. I *also* write new novels, deal with copyedits & galley proofs, pester Nice Folks for quotes, etc., etc. Telling me that I should give up my sleep cycle (which, btw, my doctor is telling me I need more of) to handle the rest of what publishers do for me... Um, no.
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Zachary Spector
User: blackmonkeymage
Date: 2011-09-08 01:43 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
FWIW, when I hear someone tell me to "shaddup and write," the fact that they aren't bothering to tell me why I should do this suggests they're not worth listening to, even if the "why" is obvious.
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brimaresh: can you hear the drums
User: brimaresh
Date: 2010-02-04 17:50 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:can you hear the drums
Shared a link back to here over at Nyeusigrube, with all the little writerlings I work with there. They're smart cookies, so I think they'll appreciate it as much as I do--some of them, anyway.

Thank you for writing this! There was a lot I didn't know.
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scbutler
User: scbutler
Date: 2010-02-04 18:15 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
"I've had people tell me I'd make more money per title if I left my publisher and self-published. I could keep more of the take. Given how much distribution I'd lose, I'd have to make a lot more per unit sold to offset the economic hit. Even doing that assumes that that selling fewer books for more money per title is a good thing. For my lifetime career as an author, I would always rather reach more readers, even if I make less money per reader. Or in some cases, less money over all."

From Amazon's point of view (and they are pushing this because they included self-publishers as an alternative in their Kindle tantrum), the problem of selling fewer books disappears if ALL writers became self-published, causing ALL pulishers to go out of business, thereby leaving an open field for Amazon to be the ONLY book distributor avaiable, so writers can sell as many books with them as they would have with anyone else. This business model is, in the way it sees books as widgets, the same as the business model allegedly preached by consultants to certain on-their-way-to-bankruptcy bricks and mortar bookstore chains, ie, "Sell more best-sellers." But books are not widgets, and it is unlikely that either of these models will ever work.
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A. Merc Rustad
User: mercwriter
Date: 2010-02-04 20:37 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
This is so informative and comprehensive--thank you so much! *bookmarks*
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User: (Anonymous)
Date: 2010-02-10 03:25 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
This was a great post, Jay. I referenced it from my website. Thanks for sharing a glimpse into the part of publishing a lot of us don't know about yet.
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cairech
User: cairech
Date: 2010-02-12 18:23 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
You may also want to cover the data entry that's done between publisher and booksellers, distributors, etc. Also, there is the fact that most booksellers do not buy from authors, they buy from publishers and/or distributors and wholesalers.
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Jay Lake
User: jaylake
Date: 2010-02-12 18:27 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Yes! Thank you.
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