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[links] Link salad asked him which was the way back home - Lakeshore
An author of no particular popularity

Jay Lake
Date: 2013-11-20 05:34
Subject: [links] Link salad asked him which was the way back home
Security: Public
Tags:books, cars, christianists, climate, economy, funny, gay, gender, guns, links, mars, nature, personal, politics, race, religion, science, space, stories, weird
Cars, Cards & Carbines - Multi-Genre Fiction Anthology — A Kickstarter for a project in which I have a story.

The Lord of the Rings personality type chart — Snerk.

When I Finally Realized What I Was Seeing, This Was The Coolest Thing Ever. Look Closer. — Mmm. Cars. (Via [info]danjite.)

Space Weathering: The Mars Connection

Scientists Confirm Existence of Moon — The headline is pretty funny, but also a tad misleading. Science! It works, bitches. (Via David Goldman.)

Elk vs. Photographer | Great Smoky Mountains National Park — Funny, but yow! (Thanks to Lisa Costello.)

Shark jumps out of aquarium into swimming poolA shark managed to jump out of its aquarium on to a water slide at a hotel swimming pool used by guests. The ending of the story is not so funny as the headline. (Via [info]willyumtx.)

People who don’t forget can still be tricked with false memoriesPeople with highly superior autobiographical memory also form fake memories.

A Cold War Fought by Women — Hmm.

Majority of red-state Americans believe climate change is real, study showsStudy suggests far-reaching acceptance of climate change in traditionally Republican states such as Texas and Oklahoma. Huh. You sure couldn’t tell it by who they elect to Congress. (Via [info]madwriter.)

Anti-LGBT activist slams church over ‘effeminate’ Jesus: ‘He smelled bad… He was a man’s man’ — Amazing how often God’s inviolate Word and eternal plan for Man so often coincides with each individual believer’s bigotries and prejudices.

Why Black Folks Tend to Shout — Ta-Nehisi Coates on George Zimmerman’s repeated violence.

Up in ArmsThe battle lines of today’s debates over gun control, stand-your-ground laws, and other violence-related issues were drawn centuries ago by America’s early settlers. (Via Ellen Eades.)

Special Report: The Pentagon's doctored ledgers conceal epic waste — (Via BBB.)

Rep. Trey Radel charged with cocaine possessionRep. Trey Radel, a freshman Republican from Florida, was arrested on Oct. 29 for possession of cocaine in the District of Columbia, according to D.C. Superior Court documents. This is why the GOP is so popular: law and order, dedication to moral principle, and Christian values.

State Rep. Uses Sledgehammer To Destroy Homeless People’s PossessionsStay classy, conservative America. It’s what you do best. I stand corrected, thanks to [info]nicosian. Apparently this violent loon is a Democrat. My confusion is understandable but inappropriate. My apologies.

?otD: Do you take a right at the light and go straight on until night? At what point are you on your own?




11/20/2013
Writing time yesterday: 0.0 hours (chemo brain)
Hours slept: 6.25 hours (solid)
Body movement: 30 minute stationary bike ride
Weight: 241.4
Number of FEMA troops on my block closing down donut shops: 0
Currently reading: n/a (chemo brain)

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User: nicosian
Date: 2013-11-20 14:32 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
That last one, the fella is listed as D, not R. Not that it makes it better. Its appalling either way.

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Jay Lake
User: jaylake
Date: 2013-11-20 14:36 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Thank you. Corrected accordingly. I think I was having a Poe's Law moment.
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Elf M. Sternberg
User: elfs
Date: 2013-11-21 05:12 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
You didn't say he was a Republican. You said he was a conservative. Those aren't completely overlapping categories.
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zxhrue
User: zxhrue
Date: 2013-11-20 17:46 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)

about that elk. good thing it was a playful juvenile, or that tourist would have had a really bad end to his vacation. much like the elk, which has apparently been euthanized (too habituated, and deemed irredeemable):
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Rick Moen
User: rinolj
Date: 2013-11-21 00:00 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
My own favourite response to Meyers-Briggs is one that wandered around the Internet in 2001 after being written by a cryptography/security consultant who preferred to remain anonymous.


After 10 years as a cryptography/security consultant, I recently
crossed over the line, and became a "security architect" for a
startup. It seemed a good idea at the time, until one day, when I saw
in my inbox an "invitation" to a series of offsite management training
sessions. Oh, _good_: 8.5 hours locked in a room with an HR-type and
an urn full of bad coffee, singing the company song, coloring inside
the lines, practicing the bland, meaningless smiles... I'll just
catch up with everything else on Tuesday, right?

So, inevitably, in the middle of listening to the usual noise about
how to empower our subordinates (half of us in the room counted
ourselves lucky not to _have_ subordinates, but I digress), we
flinched as the the HR-type whipped out the dreaded Meyers-Briggs
test. Yes, even though all of us had taken this personality test more
than once before, in similar self-improvement death-marches, and even
though we all could classify each other as ESTP or INTJ on sight, and
even though we all knew... Well, we had to take it again, and we had
to have our long-familiar "scores" explained to us again, and we all
were very upbeat about it, because after all, this _was_ a
self-_improvement_ deathmarch, and not a deathmarch of some other
variety.

During this mess, I reflected on my own seat-of-the-pants
classification of personality types, honed and refined during my
decade of teaching crypto-101 to brokerage sysadmins:

I mainly use two orthogonal axes to classify people.

First, everyone is either an Ally, or is not an Ally.
Second, everyone is either an Enemy, or not.

So, we can group people (coworkers, customers, investors, etc.) into
four classes, right off the bat, without any insipid HR testing:

People who are Allies; People who are Enemies;
People who are both; People who are neither.

[...]


Entire posting archived in my humour collection:
http://linuxmafia.com/pub/humour/allies-enemies-traitors-weapons-hostages

Edited at 2013-11-21 12:01 am (UTC)
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ericjamesstone
User: ericjamesstone
Date: 2013-11-21 04:34 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
With regard to global warming/climate change, there are several ideas that get conflated:
1. The Earth has been getting warmer since the Little Ice Age.
2. Human-caused emissions of CO2 since the mid-20th century cause some of the warming.
3. Human-caused emissions of CO2 since the mid-20th century are the major cause of the warming.
4. Human-caused emissions of CO2 since the mid-20th century are the major cause of a level of warming that is almost certainly going to be disastrous in the long term.
5. Human-caused emissions of CO2 since the mid-20th century are the major cause of a level of warming that is almost certainly going to be disastrous in the long term, and therefore we must take drastic measures now to reduce CO2 emissions.

Someone who believes #1 and believes that the term "global warming" or "climate change" applies to #1 will say they believe in global warming/climate change. The same is true of #2-5. However, people who believe #5 will often refer to people who believe only 1 or 2 (and sometimes 3) as "climate change deniers". Which means that some people tend to think the terms "global warming" or "climate change" don't really apply to 1 or 2, and the poll may actually understate the number of people who believe at least #1. On the other hand, when it serves their political purpose, people like Congressman Waxman in the article are perfectly willing to count people who believe #1 as if they believed #5, in order to claim a mandate for the actions they want to take.

If you ask me whether I believe in global warming/climate change, and I take it from context that you mean #5, I will say no. If I have time to explain myself, I'll say I believe #1 and #2, but I believe the jury's still out on the rest of them, and that it makes sense to gather more data and allow time for better technologies to develop before doing anything drastic.
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Jay Lake
User: jaylake
Date: 2013-11-21 17:48 (UTC)
Subject:
That is a much more nuanced and materially useful comment on climate change than I ever, ever see from conservatives in the media or the political world, and that I hardly ever see even in the wonderful land of blog commentary. Thank you.
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