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Lakeshore
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Jay Lake
Date: 2007-03-27 15:45
Subject: Word 2004 Mac help?
Security: Public
Tags:help
According to the Help file, and various online resources, in Word 2004 for Macintosh, using the Find and Replace dialog box with "Use wildcards" turned on, I should be able to search on ^13 to find return characters. (These would normally be ^p, but wildcards doesn't recognize that code.)

However, while ^12 finds section breaks as documented, searching on ^13 gives me an error which reads:

"The Find What text contains a Pattern Match expression which is not valid."

Unless I am being deeply stupid, this is clearly not consistent with the Help file or available online documentation. Searching Google for "^13" is useless. Does anyone have specific knowledge of this error and how to work around it?
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Michael Hiebert
User: erdnase2000
Date: 2007-03-27 23:36 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
I just tried it and ^13 works for me.

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Jay Lake
User: jaylake
Date: 2007-03-27 23:42 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Bless Microsoft...
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miki garrison: disco snake
User: mikigarrison
Date: 2007-03-27 23:36 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:disco snake
I get the same error in word 2007. It has a nice point and click way to search for section breaks, but the only way I can search for returns is with wildcards turned off...
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Jay Lake
User: jaylake
Date: 2007-03-27 23:41 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Grr. Coz if you search with wildcards off, you can't do that neat [A-z]^13 search.\

Grr.
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miki garrison: disco snake
User: mikigarrison
Date: 2007-03-27 23:43 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:disco snake
I've never tried that, what does it do?

But yeah, I'm able to search for both ^p and ^13 with wildcards off, but neither with wildcards on.
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Jay Lake
User: jaylake
Date: 2007-03-27 23:45 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
If it worked correctly, that search string would find any character a-z or A-Z which preceded a carriage return. In other words, sentences where I'd omitted the final punctuation.

I use wildcards to do manuscript cleanup, like looking for extraneous spaces between words or before commas. For example...

[A-z] [A-z]

...will find double spaces in the middle of sentences.
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Jay Lake
User: jaylake
Date: 2007-03-27 23:46 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Ah hah! Thank you.

(And, duh, it is a regular expression search, isn't it...)
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Michael Hiebert
User: erdnase2000
Date: 2007-03-28 00:00 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Yeppers :)
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miki garrison: disco snake
User: mikigarrison
Date: 2007-03-27 23:46 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:disco snake
That one works for me! :D
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