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Lakeshore
An author of no particular popularity

Jay Lake
Date: 2007-12-27 18:21
Subject: [writing] Progriss riport
Security: Public
Location:Nuevo Rancho Lake
Mood:pleased
Music:me being happy
Tags:green, wip, writing
5,100 words, to 70,100 words total. I am definitely off the map of the short story and into the middle act.

He sharpened them a while on a tiny grinder which he turned by hand. Unlike Fortune's Flight with its great kettle below decks, Southern Escape had been built for nothing but wind, wood and muscle power. No electrics here.

In time Lao Jia sat me on a little folding stool he kept braced behind a counter and went muttering work. Each snip of the shears was a heavy pull at my scalp which almost made me cry out. I held still, mouth shut and eyes half-clenched against the drizzle of tears he was drawing forth from me.

Cutting my hair was in a strange way even more painful than slashing my cheeks had been. I tried to think about why that was so. I supposed that I could cover my scars with clays and paints, or even perhaps the attentions of some physician or flesh-healer. My hair, though. It would be the work of another length of my lifetime to grow it out again.

When he was done, though, my head felt lighter. I had never considered what a weight it was, but my neck rose high and strong. "Thank you," I said in Seli, then again in Hanchu.
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Lawrence M. Schoen: PaperGolem
User: klingonguy
Date: 2007-12-28 04:00 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:PaperGolem
wondering if this work is what he thinks/hopes it is...
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Jay Lake: writing-genre
User: jaylake
Date: 2007-12-28 14:59 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:writing-genre
No, but I will be back to that soon. I'm done being snitty now.
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Lawrence M. Schoen
User: klingonguy
Date: 2007-12-28 15:09 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Excellent news. Petulance does not suit you.

(though, it doesn't suit me either, but that's never stopped me).
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jeffsoesbe: bald man thinking cap
User: jeffsoesbe
Date: 2007-12-28 04:21 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:bald man thinking cap
Out of curiousity: those 5100 words, how long did they take you? You've said this is first draft "raw brain feed" - what is the average line speed of said feed?

- yeff
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Jay Lake
User: jaylake
Date: 2007-12-28 05:09 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Tonight, about 3 hours. I was interweaving some editing and backtracking, per the New Model Process, and so it slowed me down.
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jeffsoesbe: bald man thinking cap
User: jeffsoesbe
Date: 2007-12-28 08:19 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:bald man thinking cap
Woah. Very impressive, even if I assume you type somewhere around 90-100 wpm.

As a follow-on, here's a question that kind of relates to your "unpacking story to novel" post earlier (I'm not quite sure how to phrase it, so I'll just give it a shot):

When you're at this "raw feed" first draft speed, are you semi-transcribing the story that's already decently-formed in your head or are you exploring, discovering and noting as you go along? And is it different for this "story to novel" work as opposed to a new, fresh story?

(Here's why I ask: I'm at a point where a first draft for me is really an exploratory draft, where I take whatever has formed in my head, get it down, then move forward and see what happens, see what aspects of the story and character and plot emerge and are discovered. So, first draft is almost a "zeroth" draft and I'm coming to grips with the requirement that I will have to substantially rewrite in the next turn. Thus, I'm curious how the first draft process works for other, more advanced in their journey, writers such as yourself.)

Thanks for any thoughts!

- yeff
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Jay Lake
User: jaylake
Date: 2007-12-28 14:59 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
When you're at this "raw feed" first draft speed, are you semi-transcribing the story that's already decently-formed in your head or are you exploring, discovering and noting as you go along? And is it different for this "story to novel" work as opposed to a new, fresh story?

In Green, that is a particularly interesting question, because the first third of the book is an expansion of a fully formed story, while the rest is based on half a dozen pages of very summary notes, that don't even extend down to the scene level. Generally I'm working from the latter, and I'm discovering as I go along within the overall framework of the outline.

And it was pure hell learning to write from outline in the first place, but that's a post for another time.
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jeffsoesbe: lost locke
User: jeffsoesbe
Date: 2007-12-28 21:15 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:lost locke
If you don't normally work from outline (for either short fiction or even novels), your description of that process would definitely be an interesting post to read.

One of the "outline" theories I like is the "road trip" theory: You know that you're starting at A and want to end up at B, and want to stop at W, X, Y, Z along the way. Then you get in the car and start driving. You linger in some places, you speed by other places, you take side roads. Eventually, hopefully, you arrive at the end.

Of course, then you go drive it again in revision. Slight difference in that aspect...

- yeff
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S. Boyd Taylor
User: sboydtaylor
Date: 2007-12-28 14:36 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Very nice :) Are you going to go Wu Xia with this?
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