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Lakeshore
An author of no particular popularity

Jay Lake
Date: 2008-04-05 08:36
Subject: [personal] Miscellaneous updatery on a slow Saturday
Security: Public
Location:Nuevo Rancho Lake
Mood:quiet
Music:the chiming of the grandfater clock
Tags:books, child, klog, personal
No link salad today. The MacBook is in the shop, and this Dell doesn't have my bookmarks loaded. Instead you get an update!

Recent items of interest include this announcement from dreamnnightmare, a/k/a David C. Kopaska-Merkel about a Daily Cabal short story series celebrating their anniversary. Each member of the group will write from a first line provided by me. Heh. Suckers.

Meanwhile, the "what's your LJ handle mean" comment thread has grown huge. Some interesting stuff there, might be worth going back and reading over. (Or adding to, if you have not yet done so.)

The MacBook is down for repair because a year of typing has literally disintegrated the left edge of the case (I tend to rest the left side of my left hand hard just below and to the left of the keyboard). No IM today, if you're used to communicating with me that way. Instead I'll mostly be working on taxes and doing stuff with the_child today.

Reading matter of late:
Field of Fire by James O. Born Powell's | Amazon ] — First of a new series from established mystery writer James O. Born. Born is a long time DEA agent now working as a state agent for Florida, and his experience is all over this book. ATF agent Alex Duarte chases a series of labor-related bombings through a shuffling series of bad guys while also battling labyrinthine bureaucracy and interagency wrangles. Great stuff if you like guys-with-guns fiction. (I think I'm going to start reading a lot more mystery and crime in the near future, to lay the groundwork for eventually branching out as a writer — suggestions welcome.) First in a series.

Goblin War Amazon | Mysterious Galaxy ] by jimhines — The most recent (and almost certainly not final) installment in the misadventures of Jig the Goblin. I was very taken with the first book in the series, Goblin Quest Powell's | Amazon ]. Hines did something I've seen only rarely (Mary Gentle's Grunts! Powell's | Amazon ] comes to mind), which is take hero/monster fiction from the monster's perspective. That was in a sense the sustaining gag of the first book. The problem Hines has now is that he's created a likeable (albeit still monstrous) character in Jig, and given Jig a life. Good, funny adventuring ensues in following volumes. Third in a series.

Canticle by kenscholes [ Tor Books, forthcoming ] — The (almost completed) manuscript of Ken's second Named Lands book, due out from Tor after next spring's Lamentation. He's got epic, character-driven fantasy mashed up with high concept litfic. These books are going to have massive fan appeal, while still delighting our writing hearts. A trick I'd sure like to learn someday. I'll give more detailed reviews of both books when the time comes.

The Emperor of Scent Powell's | Amazon ] by Chandler Burr — I can't recall who recommended this to me, possibly kenscholes. This is a fascinating work of narrative non-fiction about a new theory of smell, and more to the point, about the eccentric, erratic man who came up with the theory — Luca Turin and Vibrationism. Some really nifty nuts-and-bolts biophysics in here, as well as a close view into the politics of research and scientific publishing.

Next up on the reading list: Blue Highways: A Journey Into America Powell's | Amazon ] by William Least Heat-Moon.
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Nathan
User: mastadge
Date: 2008-04-05 14:20 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Mystery and crime are not hugely familiar genres to me, but, assuming you've read the classics, I'll throw out my two favorites: you can't really go wrong with James Crumley (The Last Good Kiss, etc.). More recent pulp-noir crime writer Charlie Huston is also fantastic -- his Henry Thompson trilogy and The Shotgun Rule, or if you want to move into our genre a bit, his Joe Pitt casebooks. Joe Lansdale's got some good ones.
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Jay Lake
User: jaylake
Date: 2008-04-05 14:24 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Thank you. In my mid-teens, back in the 1970s, I read a lot of the pre-modern classics of several mystery (sub)genres -- Christie, Hammett, Chandler. Re-read The Continental Op just a couple of years ago, in fact.

My current understanding of mystery and crime fiction is woefully inadequate. Hence my request for suggestions just like yours!
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User: joycemocha
Date: 2008-04-05 15:10 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Carl Hiaason is also a good one, and he's hitting both adult and YA--I'm reading his YA book Flush to one of my classes right now, and I'm enjoying it.

He writes with a very strong sense of place in South Florida--Miami, the Keys. I'm just familiar enough with the Keys that I can picture the scenes in this book. One thing about that particular genre is that you can do the very strong setting-based mysteries--Florida, Tony Hillerman's Navajo mysteries, Roger Simon's San Francisco-based series (more 80s and early 90s), Sara Paretsky's Chicago setting for V.I. Warshawski....
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Kerry aka Trouble
User: controuble
Date: 2008-04-05 14:55 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Goblin Hero is the second in the series - it started with Goblin Quest - and I agree, the whole series was a fun read.
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Jay Lake
User: jaylake
Date: 2008-04-05 14:57 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Oops. I knew that.

:: scurries off to fix ::
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Jim C. Hines
User: jimhines
Date: 2008-04-05 15:27 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
"and almost certainly not final"

All right, Lake. Do you know something I don't? ;-)

Seriously, I wouldn't mind doing more Jig books, but I'm contracted for three in a new series, so if there's to be more goblin adventures, it will be a while.

Glad you enjoyed it!
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Jay Lake
User: jaylake
Date: 2008-04-05 15:30 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
You only left a double handful of plot threads open for future use, Hines. You ain't fooling me. Baron of Goblinshire indeed.
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Ken Scholes
User: kenscholes
Date: 2008-04-05 18:58 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Thanks for the kind words, sir. Glad you like it so far -- I'll have the last bit to you soon.

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User: tillyjane
Date: 2008-04-05 22:46 (UTC)
Subject: blue highways
Anna and I both enjoyed that, hope you will too. s
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Brent Kellmer: pinky
User: skaldic
Date: 2008-04-06 02:56 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:pinky
What sort of mystery are you looking for? Personally, I'm inclined towards PI mysteries, with a soupçon of police procedural (since that's what I write). I'm not a fan of Carl Hiaason, but that could be just a personal thing. Robert Crais is really good, Robert B. Parker as well. Don Westlake and Jeffrey Deaver are both excellent, and I'm a sucker for Dick Francis. It really depends on the subgenre in which you're interested.
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Jay Lake
User: jaylake
Date: 2008-04-06 04:02 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Truth be told, I'm not sure what I'm looking for. I'm perfectly willing to be a subgenre slut for the time being. I have read Hiaasen, and laughed my ass off, but I wasn't reading him for the mystery angles, I was reading him for the black humor.
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User: mmegaera
Date: 2008-04-06 04:50 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Blue Highways is one of my alltime favorite books. It and Travels with Charley by John Steinbeck inspired me to make my own three-month cross-country trip (Seattle to Vermont to Florida to California, where unfortunately I rolled my car out in the middle of the Mojave Desert) almost nine years ago.

Do enjoy.
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eddvick
User: eddvick
Date: 2008-04-07 19:16 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
The first of the Zoli stories went up today at The Daily Cabal. The rest will be posted this week and next.
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User: (Anonymous)
Date: 2008-04-11 11:13 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Oops. Somehow forgot one of my very favorites: James Sallis' Lew Griffin books are absolutely wonderful. Start with The Long-Legged Fly, then Moth, Black Hornet, Eye of the Cricket, Bluebottle and finally Ghost of a Flea. They're relatively short and very quick reads, and definitely worth it.

Also, I don't know if Jack O'Connell's newest, The Resurrectionist, is any good, but his last novel, Word Made Flesh is probably worth checking out.
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Nathan
User: mastadge
Date: 2008-04-11 18:22 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Sorry, that was me.
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