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Lakeshore
An author of no particular popularity

Jay Lake
Date: 2008-07-17 06:20
Subject: [links] Link salad for a Thursday
Security: Public
Tags:conventions, cool, healthcare, links, personal, politics, publishing, science, writing

Rick Kleffel with a podcast interview of me at SF in SF

In other news, I seem to have eleven Honorable Mentions in the Dozois-edited YBSF, according to a little birdie. No linkie, unfortunately.

Are SF conventions doomed? — (Link via Bad Astronomy Blog.)

Tips for meeting your future self — (Link via Bad Astronomy Blog.)

Running for office, XKCD style — I sent him $8.34, just for the sheer enterainment value. After all, I’ve spent more for books I enjoyed less than that link. (Thanks to danjite.)

Italian space pod babes! — Or as chriswjohnson puts it, “the return of the fall bag.” I’ll try to find some less Page 3 style coverage of this.

Detecting Life in Enceladus’ Plume — Astrobiology, baby!

How do you weigh a supermassive black hole?

Renegade parents teach old math on the sly — I especially like the part about having the wrong appendix taken out. (Thanks to lt260.)

SF officials locked out of computer network — Weird doings here. A different class of information vulnerability. (Thanks to danjite.)

Monkey Business: Keith Chen’s Monkey Research — An old article on monkeys and economics. Money shot: The data generated by the capuchin monkeys, Chen says, “make them statistically indistinguishable from most stock-market investors.” (Thanks to danjite.)

Barack Obama’s super marketing machine — The politics of marketing and the marketing of politics.

American inequality highlighted by 30-year gap in life expectancy — “The US finds itself ranked 42nd in global life expectancy and 34th in survival of infants to age.” Yep, that market-based healthcare finance we have is really paying off. I’d hate to live in a country with socialized medicine, where all they get is increased life expectancy and decreased infant mortality. We get profit margins. I’m glad the GOP has done such a good job of protecting me from those evils.


7/17/08
Time in saddle: 5 minutes
Last night’s weigh-out: n/a
This morning’s weigh-in: 249.4
Currently reading: n/a

Originally published at jlake.com. You can comment here or there.

Post A Comment | 9 Comments | | Flag | Link






J.K.Richárd: Aroo?!
User: neutronjockey
Date: 2008-07-17 13:44 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:Aroo?!
Is Phil Plait accepting groupie applications? I haven't put him on my daily 'to read' blog list but I'm past due on catching up with Bad Astronomy. Way past.
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Keffy
User: kehrli
Date: 2008-07-17 14:10 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
No long division? Long division has saved my ass so many times... (Okay, so maybe not everybody has a long history of forgetting calculators for upper division physics classes, but hey.)

Concepts are all well and good, but I speak from a lot of painful college experience when I say that it's really not enough. The boring old methods of doing things are extremely useful if you learn them. (Although in my case it was a weakness in methods of solving partial differential equations.)
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Karen, aka Ana Lake, ska Aine inghean Cathal
User: summers_place
Date: 2008-07-17 14:34 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
On math: wait, what? The bit about multiplying 88 by 5 really gets me. Most of the parents in the article are probably around my age or a little younger (I'll turn 44 next month) and while I was taught the "multiply and carry" method as a kid, I also somewhere along the line picked up the method that allows me to "reason that five is half of ten" so that I can multiply by ten and then divide that by two. I do math in my head like that all the time. Don't most forty-something folks do that?

For the record, there was a math war when I was in third grade, too. That year the schools began teaching the "new math" that had my parents' generation up in arms, and resulted in entire classes of eight- and nine-year olds going to summer school to be taught the traditional methodology. My father, an engineer, was stymied by the new math when he tried to help me with my homework that year, and I - who had up until then been quite good at math - developed a phobia about the subject that persisted until the end of ninth grade. Thankfully, I got over it and by the end of tenth grade I was practically solving quadratic equations in my head, but I spent seven years of school thinking that math was confusing or too hard for me, when it really wasn't at all.

Edited at 2008-07-17 02:36 pm (UTC)
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scarlettina: Cliff Car
User: scarlettina
Date: 2008-07-17 14:56 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:Cliff Car
New math: I got caught in that war, too. In fact, my father got so upset about my frustration with it and so angry that a) he taught me traditional long division and b) he typed a six-page single-spaced letter to the principal protesting the whole notion of new math. According to my mother, she'd never seen him so upset about anything like that before or after.
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Karen, aka Ana Lake, ska Aine inghean Cathal
User: summers_place
Date: 2008-07-17 15:11 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Oh yes... likewise, my father in high dudgeon, ranting over the shortcomings of my school, was a sight to behold. And to fear, if you happened to be employed by said school.

Good times.
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scarlettina
User: scarlettina
Date: 2008-07-17 14:48 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Congrats on the YBSF mentions--that spectacular!
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Ulrika: Leftward Loon
User: akirlu
Date: 2008-07-17 16:43 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:Leftward Loon
The "SF cons" link is pretty clearly talking about media cons, and in a way that suggests that the writer isn't especially aware of any other kind. I'm not sure how much relevance it has to anything I care about. It's a bit like when Elizabeth Bear uses the phrase "fandom news" to mean "news about this TV show of which I am a fan" -- it's using words that look and sound like ones that are familiar to me, but in fact are completely different words.
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Sensawunder
User: sensawunder
Date: 2008-07-18 00:28 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
American inequality highlighted by 30-year gap in life expectancy — “The US finds itself ranked 42nd in global life expectancy and 34th in survival of infants to age.” Yep, that market-based healthcare finance we have is really paying off. I’d hate to live in a country with socialized medicine, where all they get is increased life expectancy and decreased infant mortality. We get profit margins. I’m glad the GOP has done such a good job of protecting me from those evils.

Regarding socialized medicine, in Canada, we have what we call "Medicare" which is universal publicly funded healthcare insurance, with non-profit hospitals, unionized health workers, and independent physicians (although more and more are going on salary). We still have health inequalities based on ethnic divisions and income, and access is not the greatest in smaller rural areas, but no one has to pay to see a doctor, go to hospital, get cancer treatment, surgery, or have a baby.

Some people here want to move to an American for-profit system . . .

Go figure.
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User: lindadee
Date: 2008-07-18 03:36 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
I remember new math as the concept of "exchanging ten ones for one ten," while my mother talk about "carrying the one." I had no trouble understanding what she was talking about as we worked out the problem together. Later on I figured out the shortcuts. But, unlike most of my classmates, I loved math and saw it as a kind of jigsaw puzzle.

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