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Lakeshore
An author of no particular popularity

Jay Lake
Date: 2008-08-07 10:29
Subject: [links] Link salad for a WorldCon Thursday
Security: Public
Tags:cool, links, personal, politics, publishing, science

A writer talks about the “Keys to Publishing” contest in which I am featured

“Slow life” and its implications — Wow. This is profoundly SFnal, with some very cool things to consider for both terrestrial biology and exobiology.

Soil tests on Mars spawn a mystery — More exobiology! (Thanks to lt260.)

Ancient moss, insects found in Antarctica — Freeze-dried fossils, so to speak. (Thanks to lt260.)

Philanthrophy gets personalFreakonomics with a fascinating piece on the intersection of wealth and poverty.

U.S. Agents Can Seize Laptops
— Who needs those pesky Fourth Amendment rights? I wonder how those conservatives who are so ardent about the Second Amendment will respond to this. I’m guessing the quiet chirp of crickets, myself. Now if the Federal government announced they could indefinitely seize firearms we’d see some outrage. But you know, far more people are killed by computers than by firearms. Right? Right? (Thanks to lillypond.)

How conservative greed and corruption destroyed American politics — An unsurprising read if you’re a liberal-progressive, and doubtless a pack of lies if you’re a conservative. Darn those biased facts — reality makes it hard for a Republican to function with a clean conscience these days. (Thanks to my Aunt M.)


8/7/08
Time in saddle: 0 minutes (extensiv city walking today)
Last night’s weigh-out: n/a
This morning’s weigh-in: n/a
Currently reading: n/a

Originally published at jlake.com. You can comment here or there.

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farmgirl1146
User: farmgirl1146
Date: 2008-08-07 18:39 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Thanks for this link. Freakonomics makes so much sense.

Philanthropy usually means artificial giving to an ideal. True kindness and sharing are something that you do for members of your pack (tribe, clan, etc.). This story shows Michael accepting Curtis into this pack, and it is wonderful that it could even begin to happen. I hope Michael can hold Curtis and others like him as part of his pack, because his philanthropy will work them.
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User: dirkcjelli
Date: 2008-08-07 18:49 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Michael will go home, give up, and hand someone millions of dollars to do something that he doesn't have to see.

And if you doubt that... explain to me why he was unwilling to exchange his salary with that woman for one month?
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farmgirl1146
User: farmgirl1146
Date: 2008-08-07 19:20 (UTC)
Subject: too right
I think you are right. Like I said, I can "hope", but the fact is that the "not my pack" impulse is too strong.

People like Curtis and being stepped on and pushed even further down by the avalanche of lower middle former workers into the poverty level.

I directly blame the federal government on so many counts for this. Our tax dollars shipped our jobs overseas. There are links to some US economic issues reported overseas on my blog. BTW, I am not upset by the list of mall stores going out of business from an aesthetic POV, I don't shop at them, but they are harbingers of more to come.

The economic divide is getting worse by the day. There is an article on Buffalo NY dying (in several newspapers/online sources today), then it goes on to say that the area has 5.6% (I'm not sure of the tenths) unemployment. Huh? I am hoping that other articles have the correct number. I have read for years that the unemployment numbers in Buffalo are now well over low double digits and perhaps approaching mid-double digits. It just how what is counted is defined.
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Elf M. Sternberg
User: elfs
Date: 2008-08-07 18:41 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
I saw the slowlife thing yesterday in my RSS feeds and was fascinated by it. It reminds me of the lithoforms in Scott Westerfeld's Evolution's Darling, a pretty darn fine book all around, which are background material in the opening chapter. Massive herds of gigantic migrating subterranean creatures that wander between the equator and the poles, most of their bodies underground, a sensory stalk projecting above the surface, taking 10,000 years to make the trip. Great stuff.

The whole slowlife thing is also a popular topic among posthuman writers: if we don't break the light barrier, what kind of thought protocols would be useful in forging an interstellar intelligence? Nerve synapses that take years to close from star to star...
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User: dirkcjelli
Date: 2008-08-07 18:47 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Connecting one, two, and three to get six, it seems to me that once we bomb Iran there will be a (perhaps false-flag) cyber-attack which will allow the government to push through an "i-Patriot" act that will grant 'extraordinary powers' to the NSA.

Nabbing laptops at the border isn't much compared to what they'd like to do.
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Hal
User: hal_obrien
Date: 2008-08-08 04:01 (UTC)
Subject: Slow life
Many of the same ideas were kicked about by Crichton in 1969, in the original novel version of The Andromeda Strain. The context was, Given they were building a lab to respond defensively to extraterrestrial life introduced to our biosphere, how does one define "life"? And just such a slow-moving life form was brought up as something very difficult to detect.

I was reminded of the idea when watching the IMAX film Chronos -- there are time lapse sequences there with trees blowing in the wind that seem... eerily like gestures. At which point, again, the question becomes our ability to observe things slowly enough.

Edited at 2008-08-08 04:04 am (UTC)
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