September 17th, 2008

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[personal] A modest party

Last night, after the usual Fireside chaos (though I was highly productive there — 4,000 new words plus revisions on two other pieces plus page proofs on two upcoming stories plus some FenCon workshop reading), we had a celebratory dinner for maryrobinettekowal’s triumphant, albeit brief, return to Portland.

In attendance were the guest of honor, some work friends of karindira’s whose handles (if any) are unknown to me, karindira, joycemocha, cscole, newroticgirl, Interrupting Gelastic Jew and Dr. Eldritch his own self. Plus your humble narrator. (I don’t think I left anyone out.)

The usual topics of conversation applied — limeade, science fiction, woolen blankets, death and dismemberment, small dogs, et cetera et cetera et cetera. A good time was had by all, but it kept me up a bit later than I had expected, so this morning I forewent another walk in favor of some stationary bike time.

And the Day Jobbe calls momentarily.

Originally published at jlake.com. You can comment here or there.

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[process] In which I learn something about the inside of my head

I am running into an interesting, and heretofore unknown to me, problem in writing Tourbillon. The book has a definite voice, which follows on the voices of Mainspring Powell's | Amazon thb | Audible ] and Escapement Powell's | Amazon ] (I should hope!). It’s a voice I like, and I’m fairly comfortable with. The challenges of this book are not rooted in its narrative voice, after all, which like the setting is well-established.

But Fred, the little man inside my head, keeps whispering seductive suggestions to me about doing cool, different things with voice. This book is not the place to experiment with voice, damn it. I’m tempted, but I’m not foolish. I’ve also never run into this particular problem before. Probably because I’ve never written a book 3 before.

Mostly what this tells me is that the next time I write a trilogy (or at least do so on purpose), I should probably write the whole thing in more or less one extended sitting. Since I expect to write two different trilogies in the next several years, that’s advice I plan to take to heart.

It also tells me that when I come back to the Mainspring universe somewhere down the road, outside the context of this narrative cycle, pick a different voice in which to tell the story. How do you multi-volume types keep the consistency, I wonder?

Originally published at jlake.com. You can comment here or there.

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[links] Link salad for a hump day

yasminegalenorn has espresso with me — A brief, fun interview.

Jayme Lynn Blaschke travels the Hershey highway — Is funny, does not have cancer.

Wikipedia on hypercanes — In case you need some SFnal weather to write about for a disaster scenario. “The extreme conditions needed to create such a storm could conceivably produce a system up to the size of North America, creating storm surges of 18 metres (59 ft) and an eye nearly 300 kilometres (190 mi) across.”

Let the record show McCain’s cheating past — “Suppose Barack Obama had dumped a crippled wife and married a beer heiress one month after the divorce. Do you really think he wouldn’t have been tripped up by such a scandalous past? The Republicans would have had a field day mocking his character. But John McCain’s tawdry personal history is rarely mentioned.” Fascinating reading, especially for those of you loyal to the party whose mantra used to be “Character Counts.” Of course, by McCain campaign standards, even the inconvenient truth is a smear, so I suppose talking about his personal history is just more evidence of liberal media bias.

The Power of Political Misinformation — “Republicans might be especially prone to the backfire effect because conservatives may have more rigid views than liberals: Upon hearing a refutation, conservatives might “argue back” against the refutation in their minds, thereby strengthening their belief in the misinformation.” This certainly explains the McCain-Palin campaign strategy of blatant lies unretracted. (Thanks to lt260.)


9/17/08
Body movement: 30 minutes on stationary bike
Last night’s weigh-out: n/a
This morning’s weigh-in: 234.8
Currently reading: FenCon workshop manuscripts

Originally published at jlake.com. You can comment here or there.