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[publishing] Amazon blinked - Lakeshore — LiveJournal
An author of no particular popularity

Jay Lake
Date: 2010-01-31 14:48
Subject: [publishing] Amazon blinked
Security: Public
Tags:amazonfail, publishing
Amazon blinked

(Via @JeremiahTolbert)

Post A Comment | 11 Comments | | Link






martianmooncrab
User: martianmooncrab
Date: 2010-01-31 23:00 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
I still wont do business with Amazon...
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Morgan: dr. cox
User: subu
Date: 2010-01-31 23:03 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:dr. cox
Amazon needs to let us decide what we will and will not purchase. It's not Amazon's job to "shield" us from the big bad publishing companies and their "outrageous" pricing.

I truly do not understand why people are getting so angry at Macmillan for wanting to sell it at 14.99 instead of 12.99. I would still gladly buy an ebook for 14.99.

Edited at 2010-01-31 11:05 pm (UTC)
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Galdrin ap Morgan
User: galdrin
Date: 2010-01-31 23:03 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Here, here! I am so ready to watch MacMillan fall on their faces.

Edited at 2010-01-31 11:03 pm (UTC)
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Douglas Cohen
User: douglascohen
Date: 2010-01-31 23:10 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Well that didn't take long!
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ruralwriter
User: ruralwriter
Date: 2010-01-31 23:20 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
And there's now a link on the New York Times web site front and center to a web page.
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Bob
User: yourbob
Date: 2010-01-31 23:29 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Nice for them. And the commenters there have, not surprisingly, sided with them (I wonder how they're editing those comments).

Meanwhile, I've found someone else to buy from and to be an affiliate of and am busy removing all links and references to them from my websites.
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Edward Greaves
User: temporus
Date: 2010-01-31 23:40 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
That was rather unexpected. I knew someone would give in, just not this soon.

I'm afraid I don't know whether to cheer, or boo. I respect a lot of the opinions by well informed authors and editors in this aspect. And still I find fault with the idea that $15 is a reasonable price for an ebook. I'm also seriously concerned that the ebook prices will NOT drop as new formats (trade paperback then mass market) become available. Because I've seen it with my own eyes. Even authors I know, who contacted Amazon to complain that their own books weren't going to sell in ebook for $12.99 when the mmpb version was out for months, and was selling for substantially less.

I'll also state for the record, that this whole kerfluffle seems odd, since I know for a fact that Amazon *has* sold brand new books that came out in hardcover starting in the $14-15 range. I know becuase I waited until the prices eventually came down to the $9.99 level before purchasing.

(Yes, I'm aware that those two accounts are contradictory, and in my opinion that is still a problem with ebook editions...there's little clear consistency.)

I think that to some portion of the populace, Amazon will look the hero, trying to defend them, and to the rest they will look the villain.

Edited at 2010-02-01 12:13 am (UTC)
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Laura Anne Gilman
User: suricattus
Date: 2010-02-01 00:34 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
I'm also seriously concerned that the ebook prices will NOT drop as new formats (trade paperback then mass market) become available. Because I've seen it with my own eyes. Even authors I know, who contacted Amazon to complain that their own books weren't going to sell in ebook for $12.99 when the mmpb version was out for months, and was selling for substantially less.

Well, I can tell you that the moment my series from Luna hit in mass this week, the price of the ebooks on BN.com dropped to about 50 cents less than the mass market edition.

The market will shake it out, given the chance. I'm not sure Macmillan's plan is one that will make authors the most money, every time....but I believe in an open market.

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Edward Greaves
User: temporus
Date: 2010-02-01 01:52 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Well, I just checked it, and my memory was off. It's still listed as $14.27 for the ebook price. Even though the mmpb version is out(and has been for well over two years). I actually gave up on waiting for the price to sort out. Thankfully, I was able to meet up with said author and purchase one of his personal stock (and got it autographed) but that's the kind of thing that shouldn't ever happen.

What you describe should be not merely the norm, but automatic. There shouldn't need to be human intervention, and whether it was Amazon that mucked up, or the publisher, still an email or two should be all it takes to resolve. That it's much later and still not resolved...leaves me with less confidence in the entire system that "the market will shake it out."

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barry_king: Me
User: barry_king
Date: 2010-01-31 23:43 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:Me
And now Amazon has successfully put a $15 cap on ebooks...
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Twilight: Daria
User: twilight2000
Date: 2010-01-31 23:45 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:Daria
Glad they blinked - never seen such a self-serving piece-of-crap letter written by a corp - but glad they blinked.
Still not "buying" e-books till i can OWN them. Nope, not gonna do it.

I won't "buy" any book that limits how i can use it* or can be stolen in the middle of the night because some publisher changes their mind AFTER I buy it.

I have NO clue why people think this is "buying" - because in any real sense of the word, e-books are not "bought" - they're "leased" at best.

I'll rent 'em (like Netflix or Rhapsody with a monthly subscription), but I'm not playing the "you bought it" "oops, no you didn't" game.

* if I buy a paper book, i can read it, store it anywhere I like, lend it out, donate it, etc. If I "buy" an e-book, AMAZON gets to tell me on what system I'm allowed to read it (in paper book parlance that's as ludicrous as telling me I can read it in my house, but not at the coffee shop or in my car), they can take it back, I can't lend it out (and there are ANY NUMBER of tools that would control that - ask any programmer about version control software) - the point is, I get more use from my bloody Netflix account - i can lend the damn movie out if I want - I just have to wait for it to come back to get a new one - which is eminently fair.


Edited at 2010-01-31 11:52 pm (UTC)
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