?

Log in

No account? Create an account
Lakeshore
An author of no particular popularity

Jay Lake
Date: 2010-06-22 05:46
Subject: [links] Link salad looks down across the river
Security: Public
Tags:cancer, cool, health, healthcare, links, personal, photos, politics, process, publishing, science
Scrivener's Error is sensible on protecting your ideas — A lot of paranoia occasionally erupts on this topic. Worth the read.

Housing, Superbugs, and Mosquitoes — MG Ellington on low-end, critical futurism, at Science In My Fiction.

Brown Dwarf Planets and HabitabilityCentauri Dreams with more on one of my favorite astronomy topics, especially as this relates closely to Sunspin. I especially like the note about temperature and intelligence.

Inferior BloodIf it's OK to reject blood from gay men, what about blacks? (Thanks to willyumtx.)

The Argument over AgingCan a drug extend good health and postpone the effects of aging? Anagathics don't help me much if cancer doesn't let me live to be old.

Islands of Four Mountains from AboveAPOD with an eerie, alien-like image of four Alaskan volcanoes.

The Speedway: 1905 — New York City, with the least amount of traffic you will ever see. (Via Shorpy, of course.)

Staying Off The Bandwagon — Conservative commentator Daniel Larison on rhetoric, among other things. ...outrage is no substitute for good judgment and critical thinking and that the impulse to score quick, emotionally satisfying victories at expense of unsympathetic, relatively weaker parties frequently leads to terrible abuses and errors.

ACLU chief 'disgusted' with Obama — Yep. We wanted better, not more of the same. If I preferred abusive security policies, runaway deficits, extraconstitutionalism, uncontrolled power and a unitary executive, I'd be a Republican. That's what we got the last time they were in power, that's what we tried to get rid of.

?otD: How many mountains have you climbed?



6/22/2010
Writing time yesterday: n/a
Body movement: 30 minute stationary bike ride
Hours slept: 8.0 (fiftful)
This morning's weigh-in: 227.2
Yesterday's chemo stress index: 7/10 (post-infusion)
Currently (re)reading: Wintersmith by Terry Pratchett

Post A Comment | 7 Comments | | Link






Jay Lake
User: jaylake
Date: 2010-06-22 15:16 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
You're welcome!
Reply | Parent | Thread | Link



Shaughn
User: shogunhb
Date: 2010-06-22 15:05 (UTC)
Subject: Anti-aging
One amazing thing about the longevity pathways is that most of them are downstream of the insulin receptor and frequently have effects on metabolic diseases as well.

Rapamycin specifically can prevent the development of obesity and diabetes in susceptible mouse strains who are fed high-fat diets. There is also evidence of decreased cancer risk and increased metabolic fitness.

http://tinyurl.com/2cnacwp

Reply | Thread | Link



ericjamesstone
User: ericjamesstone
Date: 2010-06-23 05:07 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
I'm not allowed to donate blood because I lived in England 28 years ago. But that doesn't put me in a group favored by liberals, so you won't see any whining about that restriction in Slate.
Reply | Thread | Link



russ: quo vadis
User: goulo
Date: 2010-06-23 06:25 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:quo vadis
But a commenter there wrote "Great article. I'd love to give you some or my blood, it's a very rare type, but I can't, I'm English."

So such whining did appear in Slate (albeit in a comment, nonetheless by someone aligned with Slate's stance), thus technically invalidating your whining about Slate's liberal bias. :)

(The definition of "whining" in this context is to complain about something which is not an important issue to the person calling it "whining", right...?)
Reply | Parent | Thread | Link



ericjamesstone
User: ericjamesstone
Date: 2010-06-23 13:10 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Touche.
Reply | Parent | Thread | Link



Jay Lake
User: jaylake
Date: 2010-06-23 12:06 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Me, too, for various reasons long before cancer.
Reply | Parent | Thread | Link



browse
my journal
links
January 2014
2012 appearances