?

Log in

No account? Create an account
[politics|healthcare] Dear GOP - the collective you are an Idiot - Lakeshore — LiveJournal
An author of no particular popularity

Jay Lake
Date: 2011-02-06 06:09
Subject: [politics|healthcare] Dear GOP - the collective you are an Idiot
Security: Public
Tags:healthcare, memes, politics
Originally posted by ladyqkat at Dear GOP - the collective you are an Idiot



(Post originally seen in this post by [info]ramblin_phyl. I have been notified that it was originally posted by [info]suricattus in her journal post. The story and words are hers, but I do believe that it needs to go viral and that as many people as possible need to get their stories out there. Only by making a noise about this can we make a change in our society.)


There is a move afoot in the nation -driven by the GOP - to repeal the new health care laws, to protect corporate interests, to defend against fear-mongering (and stupid) cries of "socialism!", and to ensure that people are forced to choose between keeping a roof over their heads or getting necessary health care.


This movement is killing people.


Think I'm overstating the fact?


Ask the friends and family of writer/reviewer Melissa Mia Hall, who died of a heart attack last week because she was so terrified of medical bills, she didn't go see a doctor who could have saved her life.


From another writer friend: One person. Not the only one. That could have been me. Yeah, I have access to insurance -- I live in New York City, which is freelancer-friendly, and have access to freelancer advocacy groups. Through them, I can pay over $400/month ($5,760/year) as a single, healthy woman, so that if I go to the hospital I'm not driven to bankruptcy. But a doctor's appointment - a routine physical - can still cost me several hundred dollars each visit. So unless something's terribly wrong? I won't go.


My husband worked for the government for 30 years. We have government employee (retired) insurance. It is the only thing of value he took away from that job. His pension is pitiful. He still works part time. My writing income has diminished drastically. Our combined income is now less than what it was before T retired fifteen years ago. Inflation has diminished it further. In the last 30 days I have racked up over $8000 in medical bills for tests and the beginning of treatment. Our co-pay is 20% after the deductible. And there is more to come. Our savings are already gone. I have the gold standard of insurance and I still can't pay all the medical bills.


Another friend lost her insurance when her husband lost his job. She couldn't afford medication and ended up bed ridden for three months at the end of over a year of no job and therefore no insurance until he found work again.


It's our responsibility. All of us, together. As a nation.


EtA: Nobody is trying to put insurance companies out of business. They will always be able to offer a better plan for a premium. We simply want to ensure that every citizen - from infant to senior citizen - doesn't have to choose between medical care, and keeping a roof over their heads, or having enough to eat.


We're trying to get this to go viral. Pass it along.




Post A Comment | 18 Comments | | Link






ericjamesstone
User: ericjamesstone
Date: 2011-02-06 17:45 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
What a great idea this post is, because like most Republicans, I'm always persuaded by stuff that starts off calling me an idiot.

There will always be anecdotes of people who died or didn't receive proper treatment because of the particular system of health care a country has. There are similar stories about people in Canada and the U.K. -- would you shift to opposing government-run health care after reading a couple of anecdotes?
Reply | Thread | Link



Sue Burke
User: mount_oregano
Date: 2011-02-06 18:05 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
I live in a country with socialized medicine -- Spain. People live longer and are healthier, and fewer babies die in infancy than in the US. Except for a few rare kinds of cancer, the Spanish system has better outcomes -- and for only two-thirds the cost. It's not just anecdotes, it's data. The US system is bad. Why do you prefer it?
Reply | Parent | Thread | Link



Danny Adams
User: madwriter
Date: 2011-02-07 00:12 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
A couple I know in the Netherlands has been praising their government-run health care system up and down in the time leading up to and just following their having another child. Over there, the system also provides a free nurse to go home with the mother for a few days after she leaves the hospital so she can get any medical care she might need while being able to stay at home.
Reply | Parent | Thread | Link



Sue Burke
User: mount_oregano
Date: 2011-02-07 13:48 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
That kind of preventive care helps keep overall costs down, but from an insurance company's point of view, it's not cost-effective, since the savings will come so far down the line it won't be there to make a profit from it.

That's why the US leads the developed world in amputated feet due to poor control of diabetes. It costs money to control diabetes, and there's no quick payback, and the patient may be on some other company's insurance by the time the foot goes bad, if not Medicare (one reason why Medicare is so expensive), so keeping the patient healthy is not in the insurance company's best interests.
Reply | Parent | Thread | Link



kellymccullough
User: kellymccullough
Date: 2011-02-07 14:21 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Anyone who know anything about politics understands that anecdotes are excellent tools for shifting debate, but the numbers are there too. Go look at where the US ranks in terms of health outcomes and costs. I'll give you a hint, we come in near last in virtually every measure of health care outcomes among countries with a modern health care infrastructure. And, we also come in worst for price, generally two to three times the cost per-capita of most of those other countries. American health care is an overpriced disaster that kills people.
Reply | Parent | Thread | Link



Kenneth Mark Hoover
User: kmarkhoover
Date: 2011-02-06 18:36 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
It's simply more Kabuki theater on the part of the con$ervatives. There's no way they're going to be able to repeal it so I am not worried.

It's just more inane jabber from an already morally and ideologically bankrupt political party. When the GOOPers had the votes to get rid of a woman's right to choose and Social Security and everything else they never did it. They just like to throw bombs to whip up their Mr. Whitebread Troglodyte base. And since those people are incapable of self-reflection anyway it works time and time again...which is why the GOOP does it.
Reply | Thread | Link



Msconduct
User: msconduct
Date: 2011-02-06 20:48 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Nobody is trying to put insurance companies out of business.

This part I don't understand. Why the hell not put insurance companies out of business? What's so holy about insurance companies? If the model's broke...
Reply | Thread | Link



pingback_bot
User: pingback_bot
Date: 2011-02-06 20:54 (UTC)
Subject: When I Go To The Doctor In NZ, or, Government-Subsidized Health Care
User tyellas referenced to your post from When I Go To The Doctor In NZ, or, Government-Subsidized Health Care saying: [...] law in the U.S.A. and the fact that the health care status quo there is, literally, killing people. [...]
Reply | Thread | Link



Tyellas
User: tyellas
Date: 2011-02-06 21:30 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
I lived in America for 28 years with a lot of medical privilege and knowledge - my father was a surgeon/researcher at Yale and Cornell, and I worked as a medical editor.

Now, I live in a country with government-subsidized health care, New Zealand. It's not perfect, but it works well overall. We manage it even though New Zealand's GDP is tiny compared to the USA's. Here's what I experience and pay when I have to go to the doctor in New Zealand
Reply | Thread | Link



User: barbhendee
Date: 2011-02-06 22:13 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:Autumn
The main problem I see is our nation's mindset.

We need to move away from functioning under a "for profit health insurance" system, and start helping our country to build some kind of "health care" system for its people.

As long as everything is functioning completely around large companies whose only goal is to make as much profit possible we're going to be stuck in the current mess.
Reply | Thread | Link



oaksylph
User: oaksylph
Date: 2011-02-07 01:39 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
HEAR HEAR!
Reply | Parent | Thread | Link



ulfhirtha
User: ulfhirtha
Date: 2011-02-07 03:29 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Indeed...and while many of the boosters talk a big game about a "Christian nation", it is clear that it is really Mammon who has their heart.
Reply | Parent | Thread | Link



jenntheamazon
User: jenntheamazon
Date: 2011-02-06 23:54 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Ugh...I both love and hate insurance companies. without them, I could not afford all of my insulin or diabetic supplies without going broke. (That stuff is crazy expensive!) Probably would have put my parents in the poor house worse that we already were at the time when I was a kid if it weren't for insurance companies. Thats what I find is so *WRONG*! Health care is just too damn expensive. If there was a way to fix that paradigm, that would help sway the bell curve of being able to afford health care if you don't have access to insurance. I feel the same way about car insurance...but thats a whole other tyrade.
Reply | Thread | Link



emmainfiniti
User: emmainfiniti
Date: 2011-02-07 00:39 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
"It's our responsibility. All of us, together. As a nation."
Amen
Reply | Thread | Link



thefaeway
User: thefaeway
Date: 2011-02-07 04:29 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
First I think people need to get over fears of socialism. It's so much better than the economocracy that we have and the democracy we believe we have. People are just afraid of the title because of the Nazis the same way they're afraid of the word communism because of the countries that didn't really practice communism so much as applied the tag to their party name (the same way we continue to call ourselves a democracy).

Then if this health care bill didn't require, by law, that everyone have insurance or pay as some kind of punishment.
Reply | Thread | Link



Jay Lake
User: jaylake
Date: 2011-02-07 04:37 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
The health insurance mandate is not so different from the automobile insurance mandate, at its heart. Just as food for thought. (And yes, obviously you have a choice about whether or not to own an automobile in the first place...)

Edited at 2011-02-07 04:37 am (UTC)
Reply | Parent | Thread | Link



thefaeway
User: thefaeway
Date: 2011-02-07 04:48 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
I believe the biggest difference being I can hurt/kill you with my car. Not so much by merely existing.
Reply | Parent | Thread | Link



Jay Lake
User: jaylake
Date: 2011-02-07 14:56 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Well, yes. Not quite where I was going with that (was more thinking about the objections people have raised to the idea of a mandate as a matter of political principle), but yes.
Reply | Parent | Thread | Link



browse
my journal
links
January 2014
2012 appearances