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Lakeshore
An author of no particular popularity

Jay Lake
Date: 2011-04-17 19:18
Subject: [help] American social history
Security: Public
Tags:family, help, history
My dad is doing some historical/genealogical research on our family, and is stumped by an item from the 1910 U.S. Census. He's hoping someone out here in the blogosphere can shed some light. So far his Google fu has been inadequate.

Dad says:
Two men in their 40’s living together at time of 1910 census in New York. Both employed as silk finishers in a silk mill.

One is listed as head of household and single. He apparently remained single for his whole life.

The other is listed as “partner” and married – having been married 20 years.

Anyone understand the use of the term partner in the 1910 census?

Thanks!

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houseboatonstyx
User: houseboatonstyx
Date: 2011-04-18 02:20 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
See "Paint Your Wagon"? ;-)
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Twilight: History
User: twilight2000
Date: 2011-04-18 02:30 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:History
I haven't looked it up, but could it be suggesting they're business partners? I've have trouble believing anything else of a census of that era...
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Alan Yee
User: alan_yee
Date: 2011-04-18 02:31 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
My mom has done considerable genealogical research on her half of the family. I sort of picked up the interest when I was pretty little. I've never seen the use of the word "partner" in the 1910 census on any of the pages with my ancestors. Maybe "partner" in this case simply means that they work at the same mill and happen to room together? I don't think they used the word "partner" in the romantic sense back then, so I don't see what else it could mean.
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Twilight: History
User: twilight2000
Date: 2011-04-18 03:47 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:History
ok - so a quick visit to the census site and some digging around suggests this site with instructions for the 1910 census (click on 1910 on the left) might be useful. The pages 20-29 seem to have the instructions that would be most likely to give you something useful...

PG 28: 103. Column 4. Relationship to head of family. -Designate the head of the family, whether husband or father, widow or unmarried person of either sex, by the word "Head;" for other members of a family write wife, father, mother, son, daughter, grandson, daughter-in-law, uncle, aunt, nephew, niece, boarder, ledger, servant, etc., according to the particular relationship which the person bears to the head of the family.

This paragraph suggests the 2nd man should have been designated part of the family with his title being "relationship to Head of family"

BUT -

Paragraph 105 says: If two or more persons share a common abode as partners, write head for one and partner for the other or others.

Ah - so there's the answer :> yea! (I've discovered the Librarian Husband to be my secret weapon over the years :>)

Edited at 2011-04-18 03:55 am (UTC)
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Jay Lake
User: jaylake
Date: 2011-04-18 05:02 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
But what does 'partner' mean in this context?
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miki garrison: disco snake
User: mikigarrison
Date: 2011-04-18 05:11 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:disco snake
I am reading those documents as saying that "partner" means roommate, possibly the subordinate roommate.
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Twilight: History
User: twilight2000
Date: 2011-04-18 18:31 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:History
First - grr - the census site changed it's history page since yesterday and I can't get to the 1910 census instructions today, so I have to go off memory till they provide me with a new link (idiots).

Second: my reading of those two paragraphs says "roommates" - the specific phrasing "if two or more persons share a common abode" suggests a roommate relationship - tho, yes, the instructions do sort of use "partner" as the definition for "partner" making it less clear than I might wish; the terms "other or others" clearly implies roommates (not likely to be "poly", eh? ;>)

I'll take another look when they give me a new link...

"Paragraph 105: If two or more persons share a common abode as partners, write head for one and partner for the other or others."

Edited at 2011-04-18 06:32 pm (UTC)
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Bob
User: yourbob
Date: 2011-04-18 04:07 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
"Rent splitter" would seem to be the logical use.
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