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Lakeshore
An author of no particular popularity

Jay Lake
Date: 2011-04-27 05:19
Subject: [links] Link salad goes back to the oncologist again
Security: Public
Tags:cool, funny, gay, healthcare, history, links, media, personal, politics, publishing, religion, science, stories
Letters to MycroftThe true story of the 'Great Hiatus' told via Holmes' cables and letters to his brother Mycroft.

Scrivener's Error on GBS, Borders and the NFL — The NFL is having a lockout?

Inside zombie brains: Sci-fi teaches science — Brains...

1940 sign from a British country club instructs on how to golf around the Nazi bombs

Twitter is in Denial About its Massive Spam ProblemTwitter doesn't seem to have enough incentive to eliminate auto-spawned accounts -- and that's a larger problem than most of us realize.

Ironic Headline of the YearSean Hannity To Host Special Report On Media Bias For Fox News. Hahahaha.

State Dept. wants to make it harder to get a passport — This is just nuts. Also, I am reliably informed that most of this crap would irrelevant to State, and is likely originating from elsewhere in the government. FBI or Homeland Security, presumably. ETA: [info]pnh points out by way of correction that my summary of the story about the State Department's proposed new passport application leaves out the widely-reported fact that it's intended for people who weren't born inside the US, weren't born in a medical facility, or whose birth wasn't legally documented within a year of its occurrence.

The Crash and Burn of an Autism Guru — Andrew Wakefield is further proof that reality is no defense against people's passionate need to believe. (Via Mike Brotherton.)

Right wing upset that gays pressured law firm to drop DOMA case. How dare we be intolerant of their intolerance?

Opponents of gay marriage getting slimy and desperate — Yep. Still no principled stance against gay marriage. Only prejudice and hate dressed in religious "principle".

Fact-Checking's Got Nothing To Do With It — Ta-Nehisi Coates on the racist fraud of birtherism. The question isn't "Is Obama a citizen?" It's "Why does a large swath of America, virtually all of it conservative and white, believe that Obama isn't a citizen?"

"Birther" claims debunked in new report — Also, this just in: creationism disproved, tax cuts do not raise revenue. As usual, the facts are biased against the conservative worldview.

Republicans are being held hostage by their baseRepublicans have a problem. Their base is killing them. [...] the loopy, enraged divorce from reality of the Tea Potniks has infected the entire party. And it couldn't happen to a nicer bunch of opportunistic hypocrites.

?otD: Did one thing lead to another?



4/27/2011
Writing time yesterday: 1.0 hours (1,200 words to wrap a new short fiction project, some WRPA)
Body movement: 30 minute stationary bike ride
Hours slept: 6.25 hours (solid)
Weight: 246.2
Currently reading: Nifft the Lean by Michael Shea

Post A Comment | 9 Comments | | Link






Jim Hetley
User: jhetley
Date: 2011-04-27 12:28 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
!otD: Everything is connected to everything else.
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User: joycemocha
Date: 2011-04-27 12:56 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Wakefield's set back the state of autism studies by years. Is there an immune system connection? Quite likely, given that many people with autism also have allergy issues. Very similar gene loci for autism and allergies...but not a perfect analog, especially since there are multiple gene loci in autism.

There's also similar interactions between Crohn's Disease and asthma.

More significant is the postulate that autism represents a differing developmental continuum. After my neuroscience brain anatomy class, I'm an even stronger proponent of that aspect of autism. Plus genetics.

But that's a theory to expound upon another time.
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Patrick Nielsen Hayden
User: pnh
Date: 2011-04-27 13:16 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Your summary of the story about the State Department's proposed new passport application leaves out the widely-reported fact that it's intended for people who weren't born inside the US, weren't born in a medical facility, or whose birth wasn't legally documented within a year of its occurrence.

The proposed new application is still Kafkaesque and absurd, and still threatens to make it possible to deny US citizens passports because they can't provide the phone number of their McDonald's supervisor from the job they had when they were 16. But it's a very different story than the one you suggest it is.
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Jay Lake
User: jaylake
Date: 2011-04-27 13:19 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
I shall update accordingly!
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Jay Lake
User: jaylake
Date: 2011-04-27 13:23 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Actually, what that stuff really sounds like is a lift from the forms for a security clearance...
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cathshaffer
User: cathshaffer
Date: 2011-04-27 13:36 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Yes, I am one of those people! My birth certificate wasn't issued until I was three or four years old (I was born at home). I was denied a passport in 1994 because I was "not a verifiable US citizen." At the time, I was told I needed an affadavit from someone present at my birth, which I got from my mother and had notarized. However, I never reapplied, mostly because I had not plans to travel out of the country (and at the time it was still possible to travel to Canada with a drivers' license). I've been increasingly anxious since 9/11 about my ability to get a passport and/or prove I'm a citizen. This new long form thing is very worrisome. I'm half afraid to apply for a passport because of a probably unrealistic fear that it will draw attention to my "not a verifiable citizen" status and I'll be deported to Canada or something. (I have no claim at all to citizenship in any other country. I was born in the U.S. and my family are natural U.S. citizens for at least three generations back.)
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Jay Lake
User: jaylake
Date: 2011-04-27 13:39 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
I would apply in the near future. Luckily you're dealing with the State Department and not the INS.
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cathshaffer
User: cathshaffer
Date: 2011-04-27 13:40 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Yeah, I think I'll promote that to the top of the to-do list. It also costs $300, which always makes it seem less important than stuff like having groceries and paying the mortgage...*sigh*
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anghara
User: anghara
Date: 2011-04-27 18:11 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
"...the State Department's proposed new passport application...[is] intended for people who weren't born inside the US, weren't born in a medical facility, or whose birth wasn't legally documented within a year of its occurrence."

You mean, folks like me who happened to be naturalised citizens? No, I DON'T know who precisely was present at my birth, and from here, forty odd years down the line, it would be practically impossible to find out (quite aside from the fact that none of them probably speak a word of English and some of them are probably dead anyway so the information, even if available, is useless). The point here is that I have a certificate of naturalization issued BY the State Department or some branch or representative of it which states that I am a US citizen. I am therefore entitled to a travel document that attests this WITHOUT having to prove that I was born in Hawaii... er... never mind... different can of worms...
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